If the IRS levies my bank account, will it be valid for all of my bank accounts?

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The IRS can use a bank levy to seize the money from your bank account to satisfy your tax debt. When they decide to levy your bank account, they will send individual demands to each bank where you have a known account, no matter if you have money in the account or not.

If the IRS levies one bank account, they are going to go after every other one you have.

They track your bank accounts in a couple of ways. First, they know from what accounts where you have reported past interest income. Second, all bank accounts opened in the U.S. must have a Social Security number attached to it. That way, even if you have never reported interest income on one of your accounts, the IRS can still track the account down and put a levy on it.

How Does a Bank Levy Work?

The IRS does not issue a bank levy as a first measure of collection. They will make multiple written requests for payment first.

After multiple such requests, if you don’t take action to set up a payment plan or to settle the tax debt, you will receive a final notice that is entitled “Final Notice of Intent to Levy.” That notice indicates the IRS intends to levy your bank accounts in 30 days.

You have 30 days from receiving that notice to make payment arrangements or to settle the debt. If you do not do so, the IRS can send out levy notices to all your known bank accounts. On any given day, the IRS can take money out of these accounts. But they can do it only once. To remove money from your accounts again, they must provide another levy to the banks.

You have 21 days from that point to make arrangements or to settle the debt. If you don’t do it within that 21 day period, the bank will send the funds to the IRS.
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