Can I Appeal an IRS Ruling?

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Disputes with the Internal Revenue Service could be an inconvenience.

If one of the above actions applies to you, an Internal Revenue Service missive will tell you that you have the option to appeal an IRS ruling. If you do not agree with the Internal Revenue Service ruling and you have grounds to appeal, do not affix your signature on the agreement form you received. A hearing for your appeal can now be demanded.  Click here to read or watch more IRS Help resources.

Don’t consider an appeals hearing if you owe the IRS money but just can’t afford to pay the bill. If the notice you received from the IRS is a real bill, there might not be any mention of the option of appeals.

You need to have justifiable cause for disagreeing with the decision given by the IRS. Show your reasons with supporting documentation.

Peruse the letter to find out how to make your request for an appeal, where to mail the request, the deadline for receipt of the request, and what information must be included with the request.

It should be noted that filing a request for appeal doesn’t stop the interest and penalties from increasing on your bill.

Often informal, appeals by correspondence, telephone, or in person can fix most IRS disagreements.

The appeal’s timeframe is based on the kind of situation on appeal and the amount of time it takes for the IRS to review the file. Typically, an appeals hearing commences within ninety days after you have filed your request. Make contact with the IRS office where your appeal was mailed to if you have not heard from them in 90 days and they should be able to tell you when it was received. The 90-day timeframe for the hearing starts then.

For an accurate timeframe, it’s best to call the appeals officer. It can take a year to resolve an appeal.

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